Hungarian police detains seven Afghan migrants on border as new law takes effect

To prevent illegal migrants from entering its territory, Hungary closed the main crossing point on its border with Serbia on Tuesday.
 
According to Hungarian officials, a record number of 9,380 migrants had crossed into Hungary the previous day.
 
Nine Syrian migrants and seven Afghans have been detained by Hungarian police as the new law comes into effect from September 15.
 
On Monday afternoon, Hungarian police had closed the main unofficial crossing point and directed migrants to a nearby official crossing point.
 
However, on Tuesday, the official entry point was also closed, leaving several hundred migrants stranded, according to reports.
 
According to the law, illegal entry of migrants into Hungary is a criminal offense and punishable by prison or deportation.

Sayed Hussain Alemi Balkhi, the minister of refugees and repatriation, on Sunday expressed grave concern over the flight of young Afghans to European countries

“The border was shut and has yet to re-open,” UNHCR spokesman Babar Baloch told AFP. “Our staff do not have access, and the Hungarian authorities have not let us know about any schedule they have for re-opening the border.”
 
Hungary had become a main entry point for migrants from Syria, Afghanistan and other countries who want to enter the European Union.
 
Sayed Hussain Alemi Balkhi, the minister of refugees and repatriation, on Sunday expressed grave concern over the flight of young Afghans to European countries.
 
He made a passionate appeal to Afghan families to now allow their children to migrate to Europe and warned that those who illegally migrate to Europe could face hardships and imperil their life and safety.
 
“Those families who are sending their children (to Europe) should know the problems they could possibly encounter,” he said, asking Afghan youth to exercise restraint.
 
Chief Executive Dr. Abdullah Abdullah, while chairing a meeting of the council of ministers on Monday, also took note of reports about the flight of young and unemployed Afghans to European countries.
 
He reaffirmed the government’s commitment to improve the situation so that the youth are not forced to leave the country.
 
Insecurity, poverty and unemployment continue to be major problems in Afghanistan, especially among the burgeoning young population, who constitute almost 63 percent of country’s total population.

On the World Refugee Day in June, President Ashraf Ghani said more than six million refugees have returned home over the past 15 years, but millions of others still live as refugees across the world

Already, millions of Afghan refugees are scattered around the world, most of them having fled during the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan and subsequent Taliban regime.
 
On the World Refugee Day in June, President Ashraf Ghani said more than six million refugees have returned home over the past 15 years, but millions of others still live as refugees across the world.
 
The biggest factor for world’s refugee crisis is Syria. An estimated 11 million Syrians have fled their homes since the outbreak of civil war in March 2011, most of them taking refuge in neighboring countries like Turkey, Jordon, Lebanon and Iraq.
 
Some European countries have also taken Syrian refugees, especially Germany, Sweden, Serbia, Hungary, Austria, Netherlands and Denmark.

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