Afghan refugees represent second largest group after Syrian refugees in 2015

Afghan refugees represent the second largest group after Syrian refugees – 13 percent – to have left their country in 2015, according to the Human Rights Watch (HRW).

The grim statistics present a sordid tale of helplessness as the security situation continues to deteriorate across the country.

Thousands of Afghans, most of them educated and unemployed youth, have fled the country over the past 12 months due to insecurity, unemployment and hopelessness.

Insecurity, poverty and unemployment continue to be the major problems in Afghanistan, especially for the burgeoning young population, who constitute almost 63 percent of the country’s total population.

According to fresh reports, at least 23 Afghan journalists also fled to Europe this week in search of peaceful life and better opportunities.

Insecurity, poverty and unemployment continue to be the major problems in Afghanistan, especially for the young population, who constitute almost 63 percent of the country’s total population

The deteriorating security situation has severely affected the domestic economy and the flow of foreign funds, forcing Afghans to flee the country and seek refuge in Europe or America.

The first six months of 2015 saw the highest number of civilian casualties, including women and children, since the UN started keeping track in 2009.

According to UN High Commissioner for Human Rights Zeid Ra’ad Al Hussein, Afghan civilians are increasingly trapped in a “venomous cycle” of violence.

On the World Refugee Day in June, President Ashraf Ghani said more than six million refugees have returned home over the past 15 years, but millions of others still live as refugees in different parts of the world.
The fresh developments have become a matter of grave concern for the government that has been making efforts to facilitate the repatriation of Afghan refugees.

Last week, Sayed Hussain Alemi Balkhi, the minister of refugees and repatriation, made a passionate appeal to Afghan families, urging them not to allow their children to migrate to European countries.

He warned that those who migrate to Europe through illegal means could face numerous hardships and imperil their life and safety.

“Those families who are sending their children (to Europe) should know the problems they could possibly encounter,” he said, asking Afghan youth to exercise restraint.

Last week, Sayed Hussain Alemi Balkhi, the minister of refugees and repatriation, made a passionate appeal to Afghan families, urging them not to allow their children to migrate to European countries 

Chief Executive Dr. Abdullah Abdullah, while chairing a meeting of the council of ministers on Monday, also took note of the reports about the flight of young Afghans to European countries.

Meanwhile, on Tuesday, nine Syrians and seven Afghans were reportedly detained by Hungarian police as the new law comes into effect from September 15.

According to the law, illegal entry of migrants into Hungary is a criminal offense and punishable by prison or deportation.

The biggest factor for world’s refugee crisis is Syria. An estimated 11 million Syrians have fled their homes since the outbreak of civil war in March 2011.

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The Zariza is designed to inform, educate, and engage young generation inside Afghanistan. The Zariza’s goal is to empower Afghans to create better future through knowledge and actionable, positive and uplifting reporting and news. The Afghan Zariza was founded based on those needs and goals, and will fill this gap....

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